New exhaust and new shocks.

gs450 mufflerTo get ready for the weekend I had to fabricate a muffler for the GS450. I don’t think my neighbors were very happy with me driving around with straight exhausts. At the same time I constructed a simple two to one collector for the exhaust, I have no clue if it will give more or less effect but I like how it looks 🙂
GS450 exhaustGS450 HandleI also got some help in finding a suitable clutch and throttle wire for the taller handle bars. The brake line costs me a tenth of the bike so I guess that was a bit pricy but I was in a hurry so I couldn’t be picky. The exhaust, muffler and changing of the handle bars was done in one day and now that I have ridden it for a few days I’m getting used to the different way of sitting. The bike also got a bit lower because of the new rear shocks, they’re about two inches shorter than stock. I already broke a tail light when the rear wheel ripped it off so the current light is just temporary.

Today I got a hold of a gas tank that from what I was told was from a NV20 1925 and of course I had to do a mock up and hang it beside the bike. I like how it looks (I edited the image in my phone a bit to get rid of the lines from the stock tank).
PicsArt_1369848208516_201305292006181052053666114Hopefully I will have the time to mount the tank pretty soon -=/Anders

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The one day chop.

DSC_0023Yesterday I managed to lean a bit too far in a corner and put the GS down on the ground, I’m blaming the brand spanking new tires (and the new size of the rims, the original ones were 18″ front and rear and these are 19″ front and 16″ rear) that are a bit slippery until rode in 😉
As a result I decided to cut the bike to pieces and kong the frame (don’t get on my bad side!). Before the chop it all looked like this (if you look closely you can see that the mirror is broken and there are some scrapes on the engine and the clutch lever due to my small incident).
DSC_0028Since I was alone in the garage in the morning I got right down to cutting the frame up where I wanted to kong it, it’s fun seeing an idea take shape when you’re holding an angle grinder! I didn’t have enough quality tubing to build a completely new rear frame so I had to reuse the existing tubes after cleaning the pieces up and bending them the way I wanted (in that sense it’s good that the GS is really long).
GS450 Chop 3Everybody told me that a chop couldn’t be done in a day but with this bike my goal is to be able to ride it to the garage, build some stuff and then ride it home so I kind of had to get the fabricating and welding done all at once. Maybe it’s a silly idea to have but I just don’t want the bike to sit in the garage the whole summer just because I don’t have the time to finish it.
Gs450 Chop 4This is what the bike looked like when i rode it home at around 21:00, hopefully I have the time to fabricate a new gas tank (I think everyone can see that this tank is way too big and not even closely the shape I want) and mount the rear turn signals sometime soon. After that I’m just going to find a smaller headlight and do something about the gauges (and of course the seat needs some padding).

-=/Anders

New arrival to Chop

Here’s  My Yamaha SR400 from 1982, it’s a nice bike but it ain’t our style to keep ’em untouched. This will be a cheap build, or I will try to make it a cheap build. But let’s start with the Piston Cult mantra: Chop Shit Up!

Away with all the unnecessary crap 😉 Away with the long shocks. More updates will come when I got new tires so I can finish the frame and mounts for the rear fender.

 

/ Smeden

Updates on the Suzuki T250

So, since my Suzuki T250 1972 was waaayyy too loud I had to fabricate some silencers for the bastard. I looked high and low on the internets but found nothing that was of any use in terms of drawings and such. So I had to just do something from the top of my head instead, I winged it from start to finish so I haven’t got a clue as to if it’s correct or not. I started out with some sheet metal (as always) and bent it around a pipe (our fancy sheet metal roller that was used for fabricating the expansion chambers as well). Some ends and flanges were cut from the same sheet and the pieces are on the table in the picture above.
Here the silencers are mostly done and on the floor in front of the bike, they are nothing fancy but considering they were practically free (the fiberglass filling was the only thing that cost me anything and it was only 135 Swedish Kronor, that’s about 20 bucks or something) and were really easy to make I’m quite pleased with the result. Hopefully they don’t take too much of the effect out of the expansion chambers.

I mounted the exhaust pipes with the new silencers on the bike and also fitted the tail light, now I just have to connect the wiring to the light and mount the brake switch for the brake light. There’s not that much left to be done on the bike as it is now, secure the seat a little better, mount the license plate, connect the license plate light and fix a leak in the fuel tap and it should be almost finished for now (if everything works ok it’s going to get a real paint job and other small cosmetic upgrades).
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Of course I had to start the bike and see if the new silencers actually took the noise down. THEY DID! I’m amazed at how effective they actually are, my ears didn’t even hurt after starting the bike in the garage! Since I didn’t have any plans or measurements to go by I have to say that I’m really happy with the result.

Until next time -=/Anders

Fabricating T250 exhausts

I decided right from the start that I wanted to make my own exhausts for the T250 and after a little bit of research on the “internets” I found some old Service Bulletins from Suzuki to their racing teams back in the seventies. In the bulletins there is information about making exhausts as well as porting and what oils and spark plugs to use when racing. So based on the info in the bulletins and the picture enclosed I set out to fabricate my own exhausts (this is a low budget build after all). I calculated the cones and printed out paper stencils to trace on the sheet metal, then I used a nibbler to  cut the metal to size. Since we don’t have a lot of fancy tools in the garage I just simple bent the pieces of sheet metal around a steel pipe to get the cones and tubes needed for the exhausts. It sometimes helps that I once upon a time worked as a workshop mechanic 😉 I would really like to get some real tools but for now we have to use what’s lying around. Anyway, this picture shows the pieces of sheet metal before and after bending them around the pipe. After bending the metal the pieces were spot welded into pipes and cones before fitting the exhaust parts to the actual bike. I also had to turn the first cone into a bend which took some cutting and fitting before the bend was just right. I really enjoy working with sheet metal, it’s fast and if something goes wrong it’s really easy to fix with a little bit of welding and a hammer.